UPDATED Information – October 14th ACS Meeting – HamWAN Presentation & Deployment Training

HamWAN at Beacon Hill

Thank you for joining us  Saturday, October 14th, for our monthly ACS meeting and training.  We have posted documents referenced at this meeting on the ACS website and have linked these individually below – meeting agenda

We had a great guest speaker, Kenny Richards, who provided a very informative presentation about HamWAN – what it does, how it works, and how it benefits us individually as amateur radio operators, and what if offers as a backup network to support response and recovery during emergencies and disasters.

Seattle OEM and ACS are strong supporters of HamWAN, as it brings us high bandwidth data communications throughout the Puget Sound region totally independent of any other existing internet/data communications network. Learn how you can tap into this incredible resource, and like any other ham radio pursuit, there are no subscription or recurring fees to do so.

Access from Home N7KUW

HamWAN is supported by contributions from the ham radio community. What you say? Free internet? Sending messages in an emergency just by connecting to a wifi hotspot (when all commercial internet services and cellular are not working)?

There was a brief business meeting and training regarding deployment.

Access from the field Bob KG7UCL

Public Service Events – Use of APRS with Bicycle Support Vehicles

                                                                                        posted by George AE7G

I first have to confess that while I love using APRS in public service events, I am far from identifying myself as an expert in the technology.

The Columbia Winery charity run event is a great place to test out technology. The event is pretty easy, almost nothing ever goes wrong and there is plenty of time to test new things and work out kinks.

Since I became involved as team lead for this event, we have been making greater use of bicycles to patrol the course and track walkers and runners. Any halfway fit bike rider can easily keep up with even the fastest runner.

APRS allows command to easily track support team members and determine allocation of resources. With the use of a decent APRS mapping program such as APRSIS32, it becomes very easy to track your resources in the field.  This is both an excellent tool for managing events and a good way to impress observers.  Just use a simple projector to project the image on a screen and suddenly your net control operation becomes professional. Continue reading

HUBs & SPOKEs Exercise was a Great Experience!

SEATTLE AUXILIARY COMMUNICATIONS SERVICE RADIO OPERATORS AND NEIGHBORHOOD HUBS TO PARTICIPATED IN “HUBS AND SPOKES” EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS DRILL ON SAT JULY 29th.

After Action Review completed – On Saturday August 5, 2017 Seattle ACS hosted an after action discussion at South Seattle College to review the Hubs and Spokes Exercise.  The session was facilitated by Stan K7TEG with a summary prepared by Tim WT1IM.  This information along with reports submitted by the participating Hubs and Sector teams were used by Stan to prepare the final ACS Hubs and Spokes After Action Report now available for review.  The Hubs will complete their after action review on Thursday August 24th at 7:00 PM at the HubCaps meeting to be held at Discovery Park.

Amateur (“Ham”) Radio Operators and Neighborhood Hub Volunteers To Deploy Across City To Test Emergency and Priority Message Handling For Simulated Day 6 of Earthquake Aftermath

Seattle, July 29, 2017 — The Seattle Auxiliary Communications Service (ACS), a volunteer organization operating under the auspices of the Seattle Office of Emergency Management, and the Seattle Emergency Communication Hubs, a grass-roots, neighborhood network of community members, will jointly conduct a citywide communications exercise called “Hubs and Spokes” on Saturday, July 29, between 8:00 AM and 1:00 PM. The drill, which is part of the “Cascadia Rising” exercise series, simulates Day 6 in the aftermath of a catastrophic earthquake, with challenges including damaged or destroyed infrastructure, widespread medical casualties, and reduced volunteer capabilities due to fatigue and resource constraints. Because the Hubs are the major resource for neighborhood situational awareness and resource coordination, smooth communications between the Hubs, ACS, and the city’s Emergency Operations Center (EOC) are a must.

Read more about this event – see our Media Release